Pacific Resident Theatre presents

THE HOMECOMING

By Harold Pinter

Directed by: Guillermo Cienfuegos

LA Times Critic’s Choice!

4 FINAL PERFORMANCES: OCT. 1, 2, 3, 4!
RESERVE NOW! CLOSING OCTOBER 4!!

Thursdays –  Saturdays at 8:00 pm
Sundays at 3:00 pm
Tickets: $25 to $34

TICKETS ON SALE

OVATION RECOMMENDED!
“Critic’s Choice!” — LA Times
“GO!” — LA Weekly
“RECOMMENDED!” — Stage Raw
“RECOMMENDED!” — KCRW

The original Broadway production of THE HOMECOMING won the 1967 Tony Award for Best Play. It’s 40th-anniversary Broadway production was nominated for a 2008 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play. Not produced in Los Angeles for over a decade, we’re pleased to present THE HOMECOMING for the Los Angeles area.

Cast

Jude Ciccolella, Trent Dawson,
Jason Downs, Lesley Fera,
Anthony Foux, Steve Spiro

Crew

Producer: Elspeth A. Weingarten
Associate Producers: Valerie Havey,
Sara Newman-Martins
Scenic & Light Designer: Norman Scott
Costume Designer: Christine Cover-Ferro
Sound Designer: Keith Stevenson
Props/Special Effects: Dan Cole
Violence Director: Ned Mochel
Stage Manager: Julianne Figueroa




Harold Pinter’s Tony Award winning play returns to Los Angeles for the first time in over a decade.  Set in 1960’s North London, Teddy returns home to introduce his wife to the family. But things don’t go exactly as planned. Directed by Guillermo Cienfuegos, multi-award-winning director of last year’s critically acclaimed HENRY V, this darkly sexual comedy challenges expectations of power and gender – and shows us that people are seldom what they appear.

Stage and Cinema. “Just come to Venice right away.”
LA Weekly.  “Cienfuegos’ ensemble couldn’t be better.”
Stage Raw. “…near definitive Homecoming”…
“…a finely tuned and exquisitely thoroughbred ensemble”…
“…remarkably accomplished revival”…
LA Times. “Director Guillermo Cienfuegos ellicits multi-layered performances from his excellent actors…”
Huffington Post.“Superbly cast and brilliantly performed.”
ANTHONY BYRNES for KCRW: “The production is frightening, funny, profound, and most importantly does honor to Pinter’s ‘muscular’ language.”